Corneal Transplant

The cornea, which is the transparent covering on the eye's front wall, is designed to both transmit and focus light rays as they enter the eye. If the cornea is not shaped properly or is somehow clouded, whether because of injury, infection or disease, visual acuity is compromised, a transplant may be recommended.

There are several different corneal transplant procedures available to help restore vision in patients with corneal problems. The traditional corneal transplant procedure, penetrating keratoplasty, involves replacing the entire damaged cornea with a healthy one from a human donor. Technological advances have allowed for the development of specialized procedures in corneal transplantation. They include endothelial keratoplasty and deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty, which replace only the damaged part of the cornea while leaving the healthy parts intact.

Macular Degeneration


What is macular degeneration?

Macular degeneration is the number-one cause of blindness in the United States. It occurs when the macula -- a part of the retina in the back of the eye that ensures that our vision is clear and sharp -- degrades or “degenerates,” causing a progressive loss of vision.

Does macular degeneration have any symptoms?

Yes. They include:

  • A gradual loss of ability to see objects clearly
  • A gradual loss of color vision
  • Distorted vision
  • A dark or empty area appearing in the center of vision

Can macular degeneration be treated?

The “dry” form of macular degeneration has no treatment, but the “wet” form may be helped by multiple different procedures if it is detected early. Certain vitamins and minerals may also aid in slowing or preventing vision loss.

Macular degeneration, also known as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common condition in older adults and the leading cause of vision loss in people over the age of 50. Macular degeneration affects the macula, the part of the retina responsible for the crisp, detailed central vision needed for reading or driving. As we age, the tissue in the eye responsible for vision slowly begins to deteriorate which can significantly affect a patient's quality of life.

Dry Eye


What is dry eye?

“Dry eye” is the term for when your eyes are insufficiently moisturized, either because they do not produce enough tears or because the tears have an improper chemical composition. It often occurs during the natural aging process, but it can also form as a result of eyelid or blinking problems, certain medications (antihistamines, oral contraceptives, antidepressants), climate (low humidity, wind, dust), injury, and various health problems (arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome).
Symptoms include:

  • Irritated, scratchy, dry, uncomfortable or red eyes
  • A burning sensation or feeling of something foreign in your eyes
  • Blurred vision

In addition to being uncomfortable, dry eye can damage eye tissue, scar the cornea and impair vision. Dry eye is not preventable, but it can be controlled before harm is done to your eyes.

How is dry eye treated?

Treatment for dry eye can take many forms. Non-surgical methods include blinking exercises, increasing humidity at home or work, and use of artificial tears or moisturizing ointment. If these methods fail, small plugs may be inserted in the corners of the eyes to limit tear drainage, or the drainage tubes in the eyes may be surgically closed

Dry eye is a common condition that occurs when the eyes are insufficiently moisturized, leading to itching, redness and pain from dry spots on the surface of the eye. Patients with this condition often experience irritating symptoms and which may result in more serious damage to the vision if the condition is left untreated.
It is important for patients with this condition to take special care of their eyes in order to alleviate symptoms and prevent complications

Allergic Conjunctivitis

Allergic conjunctivitis is the inflammation and swelling of the tissue lining the eyelids and the white of the eye, the conjunctiva, in reaction to allergy causing conditions such as pollen, dander, dust or mold.
When exposed to an allergen, histamines are released which results in the swelling of blood vessels in the conjunctiva. Allergic Conjunctivitis is uncomfortable but it rarely causes injury. Treatment varies depending on the cause, history and symptoms, and may include topical or oral antihistamines, topical corticosteroids or eye drops. Cold compresses may also relieve discomfort.

Flashers & Floaters

While flashes and floaters occur in most people with healthy or merely nearsighted eyes, they can be symptoms of more serious problems that occur as a result of injury or retinal and posterior vitreous detachments.

Flashes in vision are caused by pressure on the retina, the bundle of nerves in the back of the eye where images are detected and transmitted to the brain. Patients who have flashes in vision complain of seeing flashing lights or lightning streaks.

Floaters are seen when fibers move within the vitreous humor, the gelatinous substance made of water and protein fibers that fills the eye. Patients symptoms include seeing small specks or dots that against clear backgrounds. Serious vision loss can occur if the retina or vitreous detach within the eye.

Patients who are experiencing flashes and floaters should contact their doctor immediately for an examination.

For more information about Conditions, or to schedule an appointment, please feel free to complete our online form or call 407-644-4477.

Locations & Driving Directions

Baldwin Park
895 Outer Road
Baldwin Park, Orlando, FL 32814

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Tel: 407-644-4477    |    Fax: 407-644-9549

1603 S. Hiawassee Road Suite 100
Orlando, FL 32835

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Tel: 407-291-9023     |    Fax: 407-290-9501

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