Hyperopia, also known as farsightedness, a condition of the eyes where the focus on distant objects is better than the focus on objects closer to the eye, so nearby objects appear blurry. The eye is designed to focus images directly on the surface of the retina; with hyperopia, light rays focus behind the surface of the retina, producing a blurry image.


Myopia, also known as nearsightedness or shortsightedness, is a condition of the eyes in which nearby objects are clear and distant objects appear blurry. Almost a third of people in the United States experience some degree of nearsightedness.
Eyeglasses and contact lenses are common methods of correcting nearsightedness. Eyewear may be used for certain activities, like watching television or driving, or for all activities. Surgical options for the correction of myopia include vision correction procedures such as refractive and laser surgery.


Presbyopia is a visual inability of the lens of the eye to focus on object that are close. It occurs when the crystalline lens of the eye loses its flexibility, causing objects to appear blurry. Symptoms make take years to develop and patients begin to show signs of presbyopia in their early- to mid-40s - even in patients who have had laser vision correction.
Presbyopia is not a condition that can be cured. Correction for presbyopia can be made either surgically or nonsurgically.


Astigmatism occurs when the cornea - the clear covering over the eye - is slightly irregular in shape, preventing light from focusing properly on the retina in the back of the eye. With astigmatism some of that light focuses either in front of or behind the retina, resulting in vision that may be blurry for either near or far vision or, for all objects.
Most people have some degree of astigmatism. Eye exams test for the condition and help your doctor provide a proper prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses. Depending on lifestyle and the degree of astigmatism, some patients prefer to undergo a corneal modification, such as LASIK, to improve their quality of vision.


Full, natural-looking eyelashes can now be achieved through a prescription treatment called LatisseĀ®. Latisse is the first and only eyelash treatment approved by the FDA to help grow longer, fuller and darker eyelashes and treat hypotrichosis, a condition that includes having inadequate or not enough eyelashes.

Latisse contains bimatoprost, an active ingredient that improves the appearance of your lashes and is often found in glaucoma medication. While the precise science of the treatment is not known, research suggests that the number of hairs and duration of the growth process are increased by bimatoprost.

This prescription medication is applied topically to the base of the eyelashes once a day, after makeup and contact lenses have been removed and any other skincare products have already been applied. While it does not replace mascara, Latisse offers an attractive complement to help further enhance full, long and beautiful lashes.

The results of Latisse are visible after 4 weeks, with full results appearing after 16 weeks. You can track the progress of your results through photographs. Side effects of Latisse are rare but may include itching, redness or dryness in the eye area. You should not use Latisse if you have an active eye infection or broken skin or irritated skin on the eyelid. Call your doctor today to find out if Latisse is right for you.

For more information about Conditions, or to schedule an appointment, please feel free to complete our online form or call 407-644-4477.

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